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Deep-Sound Divers´ Corner
The World Is Sound
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Modular Synthesis:
Softube´s Modular
SoloStuff´s SoloRack
Granular Techniques:
accSone´s CrusherX
Frequency Modulation And Phase Modulation
u-he´s Bazille
u-he´s Zebra
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NEWS 2
A Sonic Electron Microscope ...
... that everybody can use to build new software instruments for sample players. The granular approach to sound may well be considered as a powerful microscope, which doesn´t help you to look deep into things making the smallest details visible, but enables you to listen deep into sources of sound making the smallest details audible.
The granular approach to sound may well be considered as a powerful microscope, which doesn´t help you to look deep into things making the smallest details visible, but enables you to listen deep into sources of sound making the smallest details audible.

And down there, hidden in the deepest depth of – for example – the sounds of a busy shopping centre or a sprinkling creek, there we can find amazing sounds we can use to build software instruments of our own by importing these astounding sonic discoveries in our sample players.
But – unfortunately – it´s not really that easy to do so. We have to clean our discoveries to make them useful. We have to sonically “wash” them, we have to tune them in, we have to deprive them from parts, that make them useful only in a small range of pitches and a lot more.

And we need to know how to focus our sonic microscope without smushing the sonic matter of interest with our microscope´s objective lens.
Once familiar with these basic techniques of exploiting recorded sounds we can go even further. We can give some paint to our little sonic babies, we can even do microscopic surgeries using tiny acoustical scalpels and a lot more.

It´s cumbersome sometimes. You need a calm and compentent hand, no, ear, but you will be generously rewarded by having a whole orchestra of future instruments at hand to produce the music, the audible art of the 29th century - already today.
Tutorial number 19 in my series about accSone´s granular sound processor “CrusherX” is going to deal with all of this. I´ve just began producing this 18th part, which is estimated to be published at the end of May 2018.
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